Industry Office

Celebrating jobs @stpatstech


We do not measure our success by ATAR scores. Our measure of success is apprenticeship/traineeship numbers.

Apprenticeships and traineeships not only give you new skills and qualifications, but can lead to unexpected and exciting career pathways in the future.

As of May 2018, nearly 850 St Patrick’s Technical College students have commenced an apprenticeship or traineeship across a diverse range of trades. Through our eight courses on offer, students have gone onto careers as:

  • Agricultural Mechanical TechnologySbATWall PG 2018 - 311
  • Airconditioning and Refrigertion
  • Auto Electrical
  • Automotive Body Repair Technology
  • Automotive Electrical Technology
  • Automotive Heavy Commercial Trailer Technology
  • Automotive Heavy Commercial Vehicle
  • Automotive Mechanical (Light Vehicle)
  • Automotive Mechanical Technology
  • Automotive Refinishing Technology
  • Automotive Sales
  • Automotive Vehicle Body
  • Bricklaying / Blocklaying
  • Business
  • Cabinet Making
  • CarpentrySbATWall PG 2018 - 368
  • Civil Construction (Plant Operations)
  • Commercial Cookery
  • Commercial Mechanical Technology
  • Concreting
  • Data and Voice Communications
  • Electrotechnology – Data and Voice Comms
  • Electrotechnology – Electronics & Communications
  • Electrotechnology Communications
  • Electrotechnology Computer Systems
  • Electrotechnology Electrician
  • Electrotechnology Systems Electrician
  • Engineering – Fabrication Trade
  • Engineering – Mechanical Trade
  • Engineering Technical
  • ESI – Distribution
  • Floor Covering and FinishingSbATWall PG 2018 - 373
  • Flooring Technology
  • Food Processing (Retail Baking – Combined)
  • Furniture Making (Cabinet Making)
  • Hairdressing
  • Horticulture
  • Hospitality
  • Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
  • Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
  • Light Vehicle Mechanical Technology
  • Manufactured Mineral Products
  • Mobile Plant Technology
  • Outdoor Power Equipment Technology
  • Plastering
  • Plumbing
  • Retail
  • Retail Baking (Bread)
  • Roof PlumbingSbATWall PG 2018 - 378
  • Roof Tiling
  • Spare Parts Interpreting
  • Tiling
  • Transport and Logistics (Road Transport)
  • Wall and Ceiling Lining

Click on our Enrolment section for more information or book a tour via this link today!

Sam Smith, Head Chef, FINO with new School-based Apprentice chef 
Kurtis Joyce.

School-based Apprenticeships continue to soar

St Patrick’s Technical College this morning saw its 848th apprentice commence work.

Kurtis Joyce has been studying his SACE and Certificate II in Commercial Cooking with the College since 2017 and was today signed by FINO Seppeltsfield to a School-based apprenticeship. He follows in the footsteps of Class of 2017’s Madison ter Bogt and Class of 2013’s Sarah Voigt at the prestigious Barossa Valley venue. Ms ter Bogt was named as a Finalist in the 2017 South Australia Training Awards for her work at FINO.

St Patrick’s Technical College Principal Danny Deptula said the College has seen nearly 25 students commence their apprenticeship since January this year. In the decade since the College opened its doors 848 students have commenced apprenticeships or traineeships, with 94 per cent going on to complete their training.

“As Northern Adelaide’s leading trade and technical senior secondary educator, St Patrick’s Technical College has been at the coalface of youth employment since 2007,” Mr Deptula said.

“Kurtis joins hundreds of St Patrick’s Technical College Old Scholars to begin their career with a local business and we know through our own research that 98 per cent of those past students remain employed,” Mr Deptula said.

“Even better, 87 per cent of past students remain in the great North of Adelaide and nearly 60 per cent are employed in the area.”

Mr Deptula said the emerging Defence industries centred around RAAF Base Edinburgh and maritime manufacturing as well as recent announcements of business investment in the north, opportunities for the area’s young people were plentiful.

Kurtis’s school work and timetable will be adjusted to enable him to spend as much time learning from the chefs at FINO Seppeltsfield as possible. As a School-based Apprentice, Kurtis will complete his SACE and graduate Year 12 – an important step if he wishes to go onto further education later in life.

Also beginning their School-based Apprenticeships recently are:

James Watson with Golden Grove Interiors (Cert III Carpentry)
Cristian Neve with Xtreme Concrete Constuction (Cert III Concreting)
Cain Gerrits with Gerrits Plastering (Cert III Plastering)
Bill Hannam with RS Burbidge (Cert III Plumbing)
Leith Cappelluti  with MTA-GTS (Cert III Automotive)
Santiago Bribiesca-Diaz with Mayfair Hotel (Cert III Hospitality)
Isaac Trembath with Stairlock (Cert III Carpentry)
Jayden Tingey with Truckelec (Cert III Auto Electrical)
Chelsea Doman-Hicks with Hotel Kingsford Pty Ltd (Cert III Commercial Cooking)
Noah Neilson with A Class Kitchens (Cert III Cabinet Making)
Brock Mead with Booth Transport Tanunda Inc (Cert III Engineering)

St Patrick’s Technical College strongly urges our community to support those businesses which support local jobs.

Michael Olszewski from Stratco.

Industry links brings jobs to youth

One of Australia’s largest producers of quality building products is also one of St Patrick’s Technical College’s strongest industry allies.

Stratco has taken seven StPatsTech students for apprenticeships in the past five years and one of its senior executives was so impressed with the College he now sits on the StPatsTech College Board as a director.

Michael Olszewski manages Stratco SA’s trade sales and oversees its rigorous apprenticeship program and has been with the company for 30 years.

“Five years ago we were looking for apprentices and we were not getting the quality so I started ringing around high schools in the Northern area and I contacted StPatsTech,’’ Mr Olszewski said.

“I went and did a presentation and we opened the work place up to the College’s work experience program. As a result of that we were able to identify some really good students.’’

Mr Olszewski said the StPatsTech board is industry-focussed, which means the College is able to better prepare students to meet employer needs.

Mr Olszewski said Stratco has a rigorous screening program to ensure the right person is in the right apprenticeship. This includes work experience blocks, aptitude testing, physical tests, medical reviews and a probationary period of employment.

“Before we sign anyone up we will offer them part-time employment to give us a chance to watch them. We are looking at things like work ethic, enthusiasm, punctuality, cleanliness and social skills. Most of our apprentices do come from StPats because of the quality of the students in showing these skills,’’ Mr Olszewski said.

“Most of our apprentices are from StPatsTech because of the preparation done at the College for the students to enter the workforce. Those work ready skills are often what gets the StPatsTech students over the line.

“And we as a company invest a lot of time and money into our staff so we hope they will be loyal to us in return.’’

Mr Olszewski said the close working relationship between Stratco and StPatsTech had resulted in positive outcomes for the six apprentices.

Kjel Lillie – SbAT 2017

Kjel

Keen to get straight into the workforce after graduating high school, 19-year-old Kjel Lillie knew he wanted to secure an apprenticeship.

Originally interested in plumbing, he soon realised it “wasn’t my cup of tea” and a stint at Stratco as part of StPatsTech’s extensive work experience program helped Kjel focus on his career path.

“I came here for work experience, I liked all the people here and the atmosphere,’’ Kjel said.

“I wanted to go straight into the workforce and I didn’t want to go to university and get a big HECS debt. I wanted to get an apprenticeship and knew I couldn’t do that at my old high school, so I switched to StPatsTech.

“At the end of my work experience time with Stratco, through StPatsTech, they offered me an apprenticeship and I was more than happy to take it.’’

Graduating Year 12 with his SACE in 2016, Kjel began his apprenticeship at the start of 2017 and says he loves the work.

“They are great to work for, all the bosses are really friendly. It’s definitely the best job I’ve ever had.’’

The feeling is mutual with Mr Olszewski describing Kjel as one of the best apprentices the company had seen.

“He’s reliable, honest and his attitude and work ethic is something the production managers have not seen before,’’ Mr Olszewski said.

Jacob Prescott – SbAT 2013

Jacob

In 2011 Jacob Prescott knew he wanted to become a tradesman and saw St Patrick’s Technical College as his best pathway into an apprenticeship.

Then an up-and-coming footballer, Jacob was the recipient of the Central Districts Football Club scholarship to StPatsTech. Although a shoulder injury derailed his promising football career, Jacob has landed on his feet after securing an apprenticeship with Stratco. While his football injury impacted on his work, Stratco could see the potential in Jacob and have supported him through his apprenticeship.

Jacob said the company offered him the opportunity to move into the business-side of the trade by becoming an estimator. Using his trade knowledge, Jacob’s role is customer-based, providing quotes for material, supply and installation of Stratco’s products.

He said one of the best things about the company was the positive working environment.

Jacob was recently promoted as the Head Estimator for Stratco’s Alice Springs store and has begun a traineeship in sales.

PlumbersDay1

World Plumbers’ Day 2018

On Sunday, March 11, World Plumbing Day was celebrated on mass around the world – bigger and better than ever seen before.

Here at StPatsTech, we celebrated World Plumbing Day with our plumbing students on Thursday, 15 March. The students were treated them to a bacon and egg breakfast. Steve and Marilyn, from Master Plumbers, as well as Gavin Day, from TAFE, were our guests.

A big thank you goes out to Ms Babic for organising the event.

Master Plumbers Souther Australia Field Officer Steven Prisk speaks with Year 11 Plumbing students about their career options. 
27/2/18

Work Ready skills make the difference in the jobs stakes

St Patrick’s Technical College students are more ready for the work force than their peers attending other pre-vocational programs, according to one industry group.

Master Plumbers South Australia field officer Steven Prisk (pictured speaking with the students) said he was continually impressed by StPatsTech students, with eight Old Scholars currently doing their apprenticeships thanks to Master Plumbers SA.

“I think the quality of students and what the school is teaching here at St Patrick’s in terms of what the workforce needs is fantastic,’’ Mr Prisk said.

“We do find the students here are very mature and they are work-ready. They tend to hit the ground running when they get an apprenticeship, which is extremely important for employers.”

Mr Prisk the College’s Work Ready program meant StPatsTech students were confident in communicating with employers and able to listen and take instruction well.

Mr Prisk visited the College today to speak to the Year 11 Plumbing students about the industry and possible career pathways.

He told the plumbing industry was currently booming with plenty of job opportunities across the state.

“The industry is right now booming and going very, very well,’’ he told the students.

“I have to say, I have been taking a lot of your Year 12 students at the moment, which is great for them as they are starting a great career,’’ Mr Prisk said.

Already this year, two Year 12 students have started their apprenticeships thanks to Masters Plumbing SA. Harrison Druack and Tarran Mancone commenced apprenticeships with Jordan Plumbing in February.

From left St Patrick's Technical College Prinipal Danny Deptula, Narayan Sreenivasan, Geo Leader, Business Transformation Asia Pacific South from Dassault Systemes; Skilling Australia Foundation's Industry Liaison Officer Toni Hartley, and Director of the Northern Economic Plan Lak Kondylas.

Connecting with industry

The world’s largest software engineering company, Dassault Systemes, has visited Northern Adelaide’s St Patrick’s Technical College to take a closer look at the school’s innovative approach to developing technical and trade skills in senior secondary students.

Dassault Systemes’ Geo Leader, Business Transformation Asia Pacific South Narayan Sreenivasan visited the College recently to meet with Principal Danny Deptula and Toni Hartley, who is the College’s Industry Partnership Manager and Skilling Australia Foundation’s Northern Adelaide P-TECH Industry Liaison Officer.

Mr Sreenivasan said Adelaide’s potential to become a manufacturing hub was huge with the area already boasting a talented workforce.

“Adelaide could become a hub for us because we see a lot of new talent and huge potential to grow supply chains in Australia and across the Asia Pacific,’’ he said.

Mr Sreenivasan said Adelaide already had the skilled workforce capable of serving today’s market but there was great capacity for more jobs in the future.

Northern Economic Plan Director Laki Kondylas said developing pathways for Northern Adelaide young people from school to the emerging industries was important to ensure the region benefited from the massive growth expected in the future.

“We think it’s pretty important to create pathways for people in defence industries. Defence industries in South Australia has a huge potential for growth and we are working to ensure we have appropriately skilled workforce available to take up those jobs,” Mr Kondylas said.

Dassault Systemes has announced Adelaide would support the delivery of a Virtual Shipyard Training Project. The company’s new Adelaide centre is expected to open by the second quarter of 2018.
Over the past few weeks, StPatsTech has also hosted other industry leaders at its $15-million purpose-built facility.

Staff from Defence Science and Technology Group list to Information Technology teacher Michael Gauci during their visit StPatsTech.

Staff from Defence Science and Technology Group list to Information Technology teacher Michael Gauci during their visit StPatsTech.

Representatives from the Defence Science and Technology Group (DST Group) toured the College with a particular focus on the new Information Technology course which is being run in partnership with TAFE SA and Saab Australia under the $5.1 million P-TECH Australia program.

DST Group has been a strong industry supporter of the College since it opened in 2007. One of the College’s first intake of students completed his apprenticeship with organisation.

00074

Jobs Boom for the North

St Patrick’s Technical College has welcomed news that Elizabeth will become a centre for crane manufacturing after it was announced Victorian-based Australian Crane and Machinery (ACM) would set up a base at the former Holden plant.

The $16-million announcement was made today and comes following an announcement late last year that Melbourne-based cyber security company VeroGuard Systems would invest $57.5 million in building a manufacturing facility in Edinburgh.

StPatsTech College Principal Danny Deptula said the 600 jobs expected from VeroGuard and 190 from the ACM manufacturing plant was great news for young people looking to enter a trade or technical career.

“While we hope this will provide employment for the workers affected by the closure of the Holden manufacturing plant at Elizabeth last year, we also recognise that the next generation of workers in the North will greatly benefit by having these multi-million companies operating in the area,” Mr Deptula said.

He said Automotive, Metals, Engineering and Electrotechnology students would be well positioned for apprenticeships with the companies. ACM will employ welders, fitters, auto electricians and machinists as well as automotive tradespeople.

“The announcement today is proof there is a strong future for apprentices in northern Adelaide and clear career outcomes for young people interested in trades,’’ Mr Deptula said.

ACM Managing Director Ben Potter said ACM chose the site in Elizabeth because of the presence of skilled labour, engineers and a stable workforce and political environment.

“The location is excellent for export market shipping and access to wind farms where our largest units are used for maintenance. Of course, the weather is also great, which is important for us working and testing our machines in the field,” he said.

ACM manufacturing centre will begin production early next year. The plant will cover up to 28,000 square metres and ACM will receive a $2.2 million grant from the Economic Investment Fund to establish the facility.

ACM is the largest privately-owned manufacturer of cranes and Elevated Work Platforms (EWPs) in the Oceania region and exports to the United States, Chile and Canada.

Today’s announcement adds to the success of Investment Attraction South Australia (IASA), which is bringing companies like Boeing and Technicolor to our state.

Premier Jay Weatherill said the announcement by ACM was avote of confidence” in South Australia’s ability to manufacture and export technically-advanced, large-scale equipment to the world.

“It will create a diverse range of jobs and apprenticeships in the metal trades. This is important in the context of creating and maintaining skill synergies across other industry sectors including defence, infrastructure, energy and mining,” Mr Weatherall said.

Pictured from left is St Patrick’s Technical College Principal Danny Deptula with Northern Economic Plan Director Laki Kondylas and Chairman Steve Ludlam and College Industry Partnerships Manager Toni Hartley on a tour of the school’s Metals and Engineering workshop.

On the same page when it comes to jobs for youth

Apprenticeships for Northern Adelaide’s young people play an important part in the economic and social health of the region, according to Chairman of the Northern Economic Plan Steve Ludlam.

Mr Ludlam and Northern Economic Plan Director Laki Kondylas stopped by St Patrick’s Technical College today to meet with new Principal Danny Deptula and the Skilling Australia Foundation’s Northern Adelaide P-TECH Industry Liaison Officer Toni Hartley.

The group discussed similar ideals in seeing more Northern Adelaide youth being put into apprenticeships.

‘We like to see what different organisations are doing and how we can work together to provide support for apprenticeships,’ Mr Ludlam said.

Mr Ludlam said the Northern Economic Plan had done a lot of work around supporting the workers during the recent closure of the Holden factor at Elizabeth but also wanted to ensure pathways to employment are open and accessible for the region’s youth. In particular, Mr Ludlam said growing the area’s Defence industries would see more jobs for youth and benefit the region in the long term.

Mr Deptula said StPatsTech had a tradition of fostering strong links with industry.

‘We have had more than 820 young people signed up to an apprenticeship because our students are learning the skills that industry need and want,’ Mr Deptula said.

‘Being responsive to industry demands means that local businesses can source local workers and this has a wonderful flow-on effect across our entire community as well as changing the life of that young person placed into an apprenticeship or traineeship.’

With the College introducing the P-TECH Australia program in 2017 with a focus on Defence industries, Mr Deptula said the school was well aligned to help provide the modern workforce employers will need as the Defence space expands in Adelaide.

The Northern Economic Plan covers the local government areas of Playford City, Salisbury City and Port Adelaide Enfield City.

Pictured from left is St Patrick’s Technical College Principal Danny Deptula with Northern Economic Plan Director Laki Kondylas and Chairman Steve Ludlam and College Industry Partnerships Manager Toni Hartley on a tour of the school’s Metals and Engineering workshop.

College stalwart steps down

Establishing an entirely new school usually takes up to four years, but when St Patrick’s Technical College began it took a small team under two years to open the doors for students.

One of the original instigators of St Patrick’s Technical College, then known as the Australian Technical College (ATC) – Northern Adelaide, was Jim Montgomery, 72, who recently retired as the school’s Industry Relations Manager, a role he has inhabited for the entire life of the College. Mr Montgomery is responsible for ensuring the College has a strong relationship with local industry and is meeting the skills needs of those industries.

He leaves the role in the capable hands of Toni Hartley who has worked closely with the College through the Skilling Australia Foundation’s P-TECH program.

Affiliated with the now defunct Northern Adelaide Development Board (NADB), Mr Montgomery was asked to help build the case for a technical college in Adelaide’s north by NADB manager Max Davids. Mr Davids, who was the driving force behind the establishment of StPatsTech, would go on to be a member of the College’s inaugural board.

In 2005, partnering with Catholic Education South Australia (CESA), Mr Montgomery helped write the submission to the Federal Government for the College. He was responsible for writing the industry side of the proposal by addressing industry needs and wants and building relationships with local employers and businesses.

“When it established the Australian Technical Colleges, the Federal Government laid down some guidelines. One of those was the requirement for the schools to be industry-driven. I had already done many years in industry relations with the NADB, so that is why Max asked me to help with the submission for Northern Adelaide,’’ Mr Montgomery said.

The submission by the consortium led by Mr Davids and CESA was successfully selected to establish a northern Adelaide ATC, one of three set up in South Australia. But this is when the real work began and Mr Montgomery was asked to stay on the team to help develop a business plan.

“Max was really the driving force behind the establishment of the college during this time and he was determined to see it through,’’ Mr Montgomery said.

“At this time I was working as a consultant and really focussed on developing the industry links right up until the College opened.’’

By September 2006, the newly-formed board were able to appoint staff to the College and the first Continue reading

Century Engineer PTECH 2017 participants with Andrew Sinclair upon receiving their welding certificates.

First year success for skills program

As the 2017 school year comes to a close, we are looking back at one of the most innovative programs run at St Patrick’s Technical College this year – the Century Engineering P-TECH collaboration.

The College joined 13 other schools from around the country as part of the Australian Government’s $5.1 million P-TECH Australia pilot program. P-TECH brings industry and education institutions together to help students develop science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) skills in a practical, real-world manner. The program aims to develop students’ knowledge within the STEM space as well as directly addressing industry needs and build future workforces.

StPatsTech introduced two programs this year with a third coming online in 2018.

  • Defence Force contractor Century Engineering worked with Year 11 Engineering students to develop their welding skills to the Australian standards.
  • PMB Defence, which builds the batteries that power Australia’s fleet of Collins class submarines, worked with Electrotechnology students to develop their battery knowledge and system skills.
  • Saab Australia, which operates in the advanced technology space with Adelaide’s defence sector, will mentor students from 2018 as part of the College’s new information technology course.

intertek-(8)rAndrew Sinclair, Business Development Manager with Century Engineering, sat down with StPatsTech to talk about the engineering program he helped drive this year.

“There is a skills shortage across the engineering trades and I hope programs like P-TECH can be part of the solution to address those needs,’’ Mr Sinclair said.

“It’s a great advantage for students to engage with industry at an earlier stage such as from Year 11.

“It’s also been very rewarding to see the students engage with the program and it was quite surprising how well they took in the information, especially in the practical stages.

“The students have really evolved and developed over the course of the program, which is fantastic to see.’’

Mr Sinclair, who was Century Engineering’s main mentor for the program, said he also enjoyed working with the teachers and giving them a better knowledge of the industry.

Describing his relationship with the College as “excellent”, Mr Sinclair said the flexibility and understanding of industry demands and timetables was a big element in the program’s first year success.

Northern Adelaide P-TECH Industry Liaison Officer, Toni Hartley, from the Skilling Australia Foundation, has been the bridge between the College’s teachers and industry to develop the three programs and hopes to see more roll out in the coming years.

Ms Hartley praised Century Engineering for its commitment to the P-TECH program across the whole company from management to the workshop floor.

“Century Engineering, along with StPatsTech’s other industry partners PMB Defence and Saab Australia, have shown a real commitment to their industries and the future workforce by investing their time and effort into developing P-TECH programs for South Australian youth,’’ Ms Hartley said.

“These programs have opened industry doors to the young people who have taken part and have served to give them a greater understanding of career pathways within the Defence industry space.’’

Major partner in the P-TECH program at StPatsTech is TAFE SA, which accredits the courses ensuring students are formally recognised for their skills.

Ms Hartley said bringing students, industry and tertiary education together in one program helped students clearly see the pathways open to them in trade and technical careers. One of the core purposes of the P-TECH program is to demonstrate to students the vocational or apprenticeship pathway to higher education.

“We are working hard to ensure young people understand the many interesting, fulfilling, and financially rewarding career choices today’s tradesmen and women have, especially within the STEM sector,’’ she said.

“All too often university is pushed onto students as the only pathway to a long and successful career but that is just not the case. Armed with a Year 12 education and technical and trade qualifications, a worker can enjoy a varied and interesting career with as much earning power and potential for growth as their university trained peers.’’

The Federal Department of Employment figures in December 2016 showed there was a skills shortage in South Australia in sheet metal trades workers and metal machinists (1st class).

The Labour Market for Engineering Trades Workers in South Australia report said within engineering trades, only 66 per cent of vacancies in Adelaide were able to be filled because workers lacked experience and skills.